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History

Liam McCarthy Cup visiting Ballygarvan in 1966

newspaper
 

Cork 4-20 Wexford 0-17

Cork 4-20
Wexford 0-17
By John Horgan
Ballygarvan
ATTACHING any great significance to a challenge encounter can prove to be very misleading afterwards, but the Cork hurlers performance at Ballygarvan last night was encouraging.
Wexford provided decent opposition for 45 minutes of a contest that was lacklustre for lengthy periods, but the home team, courtesy of some sublime goal-taking from Aisake and Michael Cussen, proved the superior force in the latter stages and cantered into the winners enclosure with ease.
A lot of attention has been focused on the two big men during the course of the league campaign and the poser for the management has been how best to utilise them.
It remains to be seen if they will start next Sunday night’s league decider, but both of them helped their cause considerably here, sharing 4-5 between them, 2-4 to Cussen and 2-1 to the Na Piarsaigh man.
All four goals were delightfully executed and the confidence levels of both players will have risen after this outing.
Tom Kenny was very industrious in the middle of the park throughout, Patrick Horgan looked sharp as well and notched some fine points before he was replaced in the second-half as both management teams rung the changes.
Aidan Ryan, from Midleton, had a good outing at centre-back, particularly in the first-half, while Jerry O’Connor, at centre-forward, got in some good work over the 70 minutes.
Wexford had a number of significant contributors too with Keith Rossiter, at full-back, very influential before he had to depart with a leg injury after 20 minutes.
Diarmuid Lyng delivered some very good first-half points from his wing-forward berth while Rory Jacob illustrated again what a fine forward he is with six points attached to his name.
Cork lined out without Ronan Curran, Kieran Murphy and Paudie O’Sullivan from their original selection, while Wexford made a number of changes as well.
Aidan Ryan replaced Curran at centre-back, Lorcán McLoughlin came into midfield with Cathal Naughton transferring to wing-forward and Jerry O’Connor replacing the Sarsfields man on the 40.
Things were even enough in the opening sequence until the 18th minute when Cussen clung the first of his two goals after being put through by Aisake.
Jerry O’Connor could have had another goal almost immediately afterwards, but his kicked effort was just outside the post.
Horgan rifled over a brace of sublime points in the 23rd and 24th minutes and Lorcán McLoughlin made the final statement of the half with a point to leave Cork in control at the break, 1-11 to 0-8.
The subs started to roll when they resumed, but Cork managed to retain their firm grip on the proceedings.
Mick Jacob, Steven Banville and Lyng did make it a goal game with three Wexford points, but Horgan, Kenny and Naughton responded positively for Cork with well taken points.
The changes were now coming thick and fast on both sides, but Cork’s twin towers up front remained in place to put forward their case for inclusion next weekend.
Substitute Mark O’Sullivan set up the Na Piarsaigh player for a wonderful goal in the 55th minute and very shortly afterwards another sub, Tadhg Óg Murphy was the provider as the big number 14 struck again.
It was all Cork now with Jerry O’Connor and Cussen pointing and the icing was put on the cake for the Sarsfields player when he drilled home another goal with the final whistle approaching.
It might only have been a challenge game, but it showed that this Cork squad of players all want to put their hands up to impress the management.
In total nine Cork players got on the scoresheet and the fact that no goal was conceded was significant too.
As for next Sunday night’s team, it’s odds on now that Cussen will be in the half-forward line with Aisake on the edge of the square.
Scorers for Cork: M Cussen 2-4, A Ó hAilpín 2-1, P Horgan 0-4 (0-1 f), J O’Connor 0-3, B O’Connor (f), T Kenny, C Naughton 0-2 each, L McLoughlin, C McCarthy 0-1 each.
Wexford: R Jacob 0-6 (0-1f), D Lyng 0-4, S Banville 0-2, H Kehoe, P Atkinson, M Molloy, E Quigley, M Jacob 0-1 each.
CORK: D Óg Cusack; M Walsh, E Dillon, S Murphy; J Gardiner, A Ryan, S Óg Ó hAilpín; T Kenny, L McLoughlin; M Cussen, J O’Connor, C Naughton; P Horgan, A Ó hAilpín, B O’Connor.
Subs: E Keane for Dillon, C McCarthy for B O’Connor, M O’Sullivan for McLoughlin, S White for Seán Óg, T Óg Murphy for P Horgan, C O’Sullivan for S Murphy, L O’Farrell for Naughton, M Coleman for Cusack.
WEXFORD: D O’Flynn, L Prendergast, K Rossiter, E Doyle, R Kehoe, D Stamp, M Travers, M Molloy, H Kehoe, E Kent, E Quigley, D Lyng, R Jacob, S Banville, P Atkinson.
Subs: T Mahon for Atkinson, C Kenny for Stamp, P Morris for Lyng, P Kenny for Kent, E Quigley for Kehoe, G Jacob for Travers.
Referee: D Richardson (Limerick).


THE calm before the storm, but Cork boss Denis Walsh was pleased to get another victory under the belt while at the same time realising that the intensity in Thurles next Sunday night will be a lot greater than it was on this occasion.
“It was a good work-out, but I suppose it was lacklustre a lot of the time there. In the first-half you’d be scratching your head a bit, you were dominant for 10 minutes and then you switched off a bit and allowed Wexford back into the game.
“They came down yesterday and they are well organised under Colm Bonnar, but you can’t be stepping off the gas at this level, even if it was only a challenge game.”
Four goals delivered and some fine points executed, a positive return in front of the sticks.
“Yes, but Wexford lost the full-back there Keith Rossiter and he was playing very well and that had a bearing on the game.
“But we have a lot of firepower there and it’s a case of getting the best out of them. The two boys, Aisake and Cussen got some good goals and when they get into their stride they are hard to stop.
“From our viewpoint it’s difficult with all the good players there in the forward line.
It’s difficult to know the combinations obviously and I suppose there are nine or 10 players pushing for six places in the forwards, but we must make the decisions between now and Tuesday night.”
Walsh expects to have a full hand to choose from for the league final despite the absence of a few players here.
“Ya, we had a few out, Ronan Curran and Fraggie, he was sick, missed out while Paudie Sull was playing junior football with Cloyne.
“But I would expect everybody to be ready for Sunday.”

   

The Story of Liam MacCarthy

The Story of Liam MacCarthy: Eoghan and Brigid MacCarthy emigrated from Ballygarvanliammccarthy.jpg, Co. Cork in 1851. In company with other Irish emigrants they settled on the South bank of the Thames on the new site now occupied by the County Hall. Eoghan MacCarthy had very little English, and, in fact, all his life his prayers were said in Irish. Eoghan was a sportsman, athlete and wrestler, known as MacCarthy Capall (MacCarthy the Horse) in his birthplace, Shanagraigue, Ballygarvan, Co.Cork. Liam MacCarthy was born in London on the 21st May 1853 being the first son. Like his father, Liam loved sport particularly athletics, and growing up in the confines of this Irish community he took naturally to the national games and at the age of 14 he was playing hurling on Clapham Common. He earned his living as a blacksmith's hammerman working on the railways as a signals fitter. In 1875, aged 22 years, whilst residing at 1 Derwent Street, Peckham, Liam married Alice Padbury at St. George's Cathedral, Southwark. Alice was the thirteenth child of William Padbury who owned a Fancy Box factory at 176 Blackfriars Road, Southwark. Liam joined the firm but did not get-on with his in-laws. Eventually, however, he broke away and with the help of his wife and his eldest son, William, the MacCarthys started making cardboard boxes on their kitchen table. The family consisted of four boys, William Eugene (17th February 1878, Edward Dineen (13th April 1880), Francis Joseph (30th August) and Eugene (30th August 1892). The family attended mass at the Friary, Peckham where the four boys first attended school. The box-making business progressed and was separated from the family's living accommodation when it was moved to 48 Haymerle Road, Peckham, where it was called St. Brigid's Works. as called St. Brigid's Works. Apart from his sporting activities and the box-making business, Liam also took a very keen interest in local affairs and became councillor for the NorthWard, Peckham. There was a large Irish community in this area and Liam promoted Irish sporting and social activities wherever he could. The family had now moved to 48a Forest Hill Road, East Dulwich, SE 23 and his home was a meeting place for many Irish emigrants seeking a place to stay or a job. In the connection he became friendly with Michael Collins who was Secretary of the London G.A.A. whilst Liam was chairman of the London County Board, a position he held for over 10 years. He had also joined the I.R.B. and both he and his son, Eugene, were members of the London Irish Volunteers. He was also Vice-President of the Gaelic League and President of the Irish Athletic Association! No wonder then that he had a rubber stamp of his signature thus: - In 1915 a meeting of the Irish Volunteers was called under his chairmanship to discuss conscription. Michael Collins was present and although the Chairman in his capacity of London County Councillor was in no position to advise on conscription evasion, he nevertheless left one of his hearers in no doubt. "If you come from Clonakilty it is obvious where you must go" he said. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cup Presentation: In conjunction with his two sons, William and Eugene, Liam donated a sum of £50 for the purchase of ten Certificates in the Irish Loan set up by Michael Collins (the London treasurer of which was Liam MacCarthy!). When the loan was redeemed Liam used the money for the purchase of a silver cup based on the design of an ancient Gaelic Meither (Irish loving cup). This cup was offered to the Central Council of the G.A.A. at Croke Park, Dublin and was gratefully accepted as the trophy awarded annually, and in all perpetuity to the winners of the Senior All-Ireland Hurling Championship, to be known as the Liam MacCarthy Cup! Official acceptance of offer of the All-Ireland Hurling Cup by Luke O'Toole of the G.A.A. is as follows: My Dear MacCarthy, Your very kind letter to hand. I placed your offer re presentation of Cup before Congress and it was agreed the Cup should go as a perpetual Cup to the winners of the All-Ireland Hurling. Congress on the motion of J.M. (illegible) tenders you the thanks of the Gaelic Association for your very kind and generous presentation. If you so desire I will order it engraved for you provided you give me an idea of the contemplated cost. Seamus Nowlan, Dan McCarthy, M.J. Crowe, Dan Fraher, Pat McGrath, John McCarthy, J.J. Keane, A.C. Harty, W. Hanrahan all desire to be remembered to you. Need I say how delighted I felt on reading your letter. Yes, I have been adding to the population for some years past.......

   

Official Opening of Liam MacCarthy Park 1984

On Thursday, 19th April, 1984, Eileen and I set off by car to make the journey to Ballygarvan, Co. Cork, where we had been invited to attend the opening of the Liam MacCarthy Park in honour of my grandfather.2263459878_be65c4d6c5_t2.jpg We stayed in Rosslare that evening and on Good Friday morning made our way along the South Coast of Ireland towards Cork. There was a thick sea mist all the way and at Dungarvan visibility was down to 25 yards but it improved as we turned inland towards Cork City. It continued to improve to add to the memory of an unforgettable occasion.By arrangement we met Edmond Forrest, Chairman South East Board G.A.A. in Silver Springs Hotel. From here we drove to the City Hall in Cork where we were joined by Michael Twomey, Chairman of Ballygarvan G.A.A. club and were then ushered into the Mayor's parlour where we were welcomed by the Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor John Dennehy. There was a portrait of Terence MacSweeney on the wall and I was able to tell the Lord Mayor that I was carried as a babe in arms in the procession to Southwark Cathedral in London when this most eminent man had died on hunger strike. From the City Hall we drove out of Cork, on the road to Kinsale, where after about eight miles we saw a signpost indicating a left hand side-road to Ballygarvan. Underneath was another sign worded "Páirc Liam MacCarthaigh". We took the turning and by way of Bowens Hill we entered the village of Ballygarvan. Out on the far side of the village we saw a group of men playing bowls along the road. Just to the right of them there was an entrance and we drove into "MacCarthy Park". A huge limestone boulder from the local quarry was in front of us containing a plaque engraved in Irish. About seven acres of greenery rewarded our sight. Set in a valley just outside the village, this is a pleasant and peaceful place carefully laid out to preserve the natural beauty of the area. The grass on it was as green as only grass in Ireland can be. We then drove back towards the village but took a left-hand turn and climbed up the far side of the valley to the lovely farmhouse of Finbarr Marshall, where we were to stay. Here we met all the family and the easy, all-pervading Irish hospitality delightfully ended the day for us. Saturday morning and I was handed the cup presented by my grandfather, the first time I ever touched it, and off we went to Shanagraigue, birthplace of my great grandfather, Eoghan MacCarthy. Here, I met the two brothers, Wolfe, who showed me a field that had been used for hurling in my grandfather's time, when the game was played "from corner to corner". They also told me that the MacCarthys used to grow flax on their farm using two oxen for pulling the plough. There were flax holes or ponds on the farm to this day. I also learned that the MacCarthys rented the land on an eleven-month basis so that they never had any security of tenure. They also rented or hired the cows they milked to provide butter and cheese, which they sold locally to make a living. This confirmed my father's view that the MacCarthys never owned anything but were hewers of wood and drawers of water. So to Sunday morning, 22nd April 1984 and the big day for Ballygarvan had dawned. After Mass I met Donal Twomey, initially introduced to me as "Mr. Ballygarvan himself". Armed with the famous MacCarthy cup and ably chaperoned by Donal we proceeded to do the rounds of the local pubs! Our first stop was to the Sportmans Rest known in my grandfather's time as Twoomeys. Here I was presented with a most handsome carved walking stick; a beautiful keepsake of a most memorable visit! Further up the road was Paddo Dalys Pub where Paddo's mother made a present of a framed picture of the MacCarthy Cup, which Mrs. Daly told me she had drawn in three days. She also gave me a St. Brigid's cross which she had made from local river reeds. A further touching tribute to a never to be forgotten visit! Back then to lunch at Meadstown and the official opening of MacCarthaigh Páirc was drawing near. Finbarr Marshall drove me down to Ballygarvan in his land rover with me hanging out the nearside window with the cup held on high! A video camera followed our progress. At the school in Ballygarvan the Carraigaline Pipe Band was assembling, resplendent in dark green and silver kilted uniform. (Memories flooding back of my father and the Brothers Pearse Pipers Band in London (where were the traditional two drone Irish War-pipes and the saffron kilts?) We drove into the entrance of MacCarthaigh Páirc and down to the clubhouse where I met Con Murphy, Past President of the G.A.A., who had flown down from Belfast (where the G.A.A. were holding congress) in order to be with us! Members of the Ladies Committee plied me with sandwiches and I was introduced to a bewildering galaxy of people! Photographs with members of the committee and I would make my way up the field for the unveiling! Up on the rostrum with Con Murphy seated on my left and a distinguished representative of the press on my right who recorded every word in shorthand alternating from Irish to English without drawing breath! Michael Twomey, Con Murphy, the Parish Priest (Fr. John Crowley), the Lord Mayor of Cork, all have their say and then its my turn. I am the last to speak -after the Lord Mayors show -shakily I am on my feet - "Ah Gweenee Ooshileaghá!" Someone laughs and I am content! The rest of what I have to say comes tumbling out less nervously! "A dhaoine uaisle, beirim buíochas doábh os bhár gcineáltas!" As you will realise, these words have been hammered into me parrot fashion! For the benefit of those of you who do not have Irish, and indeed in sympathy for those who do - what I (hope) I said was, "Ladies and gentleman, thank you for your kindness". "Similar words could well have been said by my great grandfather, Eoghan MacCarthy, the father of Liam MacCarthy, when he arrived in London from Ballygarvan as a refugee from the famine some one hundred and thirty years ago. In his case, however, his listeners would have had a very hard job to understand him as he had no English - and indeed, precious little else."I am sure that during his lifetime in London my great grandfathers thoughts must have strayed back to Ballygarvan where he was born. I am equally certain that in his wildest dreams he would never have envisaged that one day he would be so honoured as to have the very land from which he came dedicated to his name! Bearing in mind that the name "MacCarthy" is the most numerous of Irish names beginning with Mac and out of every hundred MacCarthys in Ireland sixty of them live in County Cork, why is it that our particular family should be singled out for this overwhelming honour? The answer of course, lies with this extraordinary man, my grandfather - Liam MacCarthy! At this point I could go on to give you personal recollections of him but enough has been said and written about him to make further reminiscences boring and, whatever else, boredom was not part and parcel of this man!I would, therefore, like to thank all the people who have made this day so memorable and, with your indulgence, I would conclude with yet another parrot learned phrase ? Thank you for having me. (In Irish - Agus arís go raibh míle maith agaibh go léir). And so to the match itself. After the game there was a reception for the two teams at Frankfield House, a most beautiful, modernised Georgian building overlooking the City of Cork. The proprietor, Mick Ryan, is a most distinguished all-Ireland hurler who excels himself in the role of mine host. At the end of a gargantuan meal a presentation was made to every member of each team and to the referee and linesmen. Here I met the coach of the Ballygarvan Hurling Club team and listened to the comment of the famous Kilkenny goalkeeper, Noel Skehan, "If Cork can enlist the services of the referee we had today there is no question who will win the All-Ireland final!" Back then to Meadstown and Finbarr Marshall's farm where after a welcome respite we joined the final celebrations of this historic day. This took the form of a disco. During the course of the evening I was asked to come up onto the stage where Con Murphy presented me with a miniature of the Liam MacCarthy Cup; the same replica in Mullingar pewter which had been awarded to the Cork and Kilkenny teams earlier that day. By this time I was so emotionally drained that I could only reiterate that my cup had overflowed! In the heel of the hunt , what can one say? For me this is the culmination of the childhood fantasy where one travels to the end of the rainbow and becomes king for as long as the magic cup is in ones possession. As you will realise, all this has accrued to me simply because by accident of birth I am the boy holding the horses head! I am two generations removed from the real hero, embarrassed by the attention afforded to me but ever conscious of the integrity of the man who brought such recognition and honour to our family. I trust that the love of country, which motivated his every action, will be remembered and regarded as a source of inspiration for future generations.

   

Munster Junior A Hurling Final

Munster Junior A Hurling Final

December 12th 2004

Ballygarvan 0-16 Tramore (Waterford) 1-5

The year of 2004 is now drawing to a close, and it will be long remembered for the amazing performances of the Ballygarvan Junior A hurling team, who brought the curtain down on an incredible year with a fantastic eight point victory over Waterford champions Tramore in the Munster Junior club final in Fermoy on Sunday. Despite being handicapped with a rampant flu bug in the squad which left several players the worse for wear during the week, Ballygarvan opened very brightly and were four points to the good after ten minutes, the points coming from Stephen White, his brother Gary and two from the outstanding Morgan Sheehy. Ballygarvan were in complete control all over the field and only for some wasteful shooting would have been nearly out of sight after the first quarter. However as often happens in games like this, Tramore came storming right back in and levelled affairs in a two minute spell midway through the half with a quick fire goal and point. However Ballygarvan didn’t panic and the impressive Finbarr Barry knocked over a long range point to put Ballygarvan back in front. With the backs now dominant in all areas with Donal Sweeney and Ger Spillane particularly prominent, Ballygarvan drove forward in waves and points from Gary White, Liam Dillon and Finbarr Barry, with only a sole Tramore reply left the score standing at 0-8 to 1-2 at the break. The second half was no more than thirty seconds old when Ken Ashman further increased the Ballygarvan lead and from that moment they never looked back. For the next twenty minutes, Ballygarvan proceeded to play some of their finest hurling all year, and points from Liam Dillon (4) and Stephen White in that period without a single Tramore reply sealed the victory for Ballygarvan. The last ten minutes was pure heaven for all the loyal Ballygarvan supporters as Ballygarvan tagged over further points form Liam Dillon (2) and Finbarr Barry to seal another historic win.

Panel: Joe Kennefick, Donal Browne, Joe Spillane, Donal Sweeney, Ger Spillane, Cian O Conchuir, Alan Butler, Stephen White (0-2), Finbarr Barry (0-2), Gary White (0-2), Shane O Leary, Ken Ashman (0-1), Morgan Sheehy (0-2), Michael Dowd, Liam Dillon (0-7), Fintan Mackey, Brian Daly, Robert Bouse, David Bouse, Christian Connelly, Pat Donnellan, Stephen Looney, Micheal Spillane, Bernard O' Donavan, David O' Sullivan, Damien O' Sullivan, Barry Keohane, William O' Halloran, Pheilim O' Neill.

Trainers and Selectors: Jim Dowd, Finbarr Marshall, Pat Bouse, Paddy Mackey, Joe Kennefick

   

Personalities

DAN CARROLL

 

Dan Carroll Chairman 1924

 

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PATDALYS FATHER

Billy Daly Treasurer 1946

 

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BUTLER

Seamus Butler Chairman 1951

 

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Fentons

Moses Fenton poses with his brothers during puck about.

 

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JOHNMUL

 

John Mulcahy Hurler of the Year 1977

 

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JUSTIN

Justin McCarthy Coach par excellence Ballygarvan 1974-1978

 

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JERRY

Jerry O'Sullivan Referee South East Hurling Final 1976

 

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PHOTO 2

Liam O'Halloran surveys MacCarthy Cup 1966

 

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SIMONB

Simon Bowen Secretary 1929 / Chairman 1933

 

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CURLYJOE

Joe Kennefick Cork Under 21 H 1985

 

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TIMMY

Tim O'Callaghan Chairman 1974

 

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MOSES

Moses Fenton Secretary 1959

 

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DONAL

Donal Twomey President 2000

 

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PHOTO1

Ballygarvan 1966 - Billy O'Halloran, Gerald McCarthy, Paddy Sheehan.

 

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PHOTO5

1966 Ballygarvan N.S. Visit, Gerald McCarthy with All-Ireland trophy sit, Gerald McCarthy with All-Ireland trophy

 

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PHOTO 3

1976 Finance Committee

 

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DT

Donal Twomey Hall of Fame Winner 2001 with Family and Con Murphy

 

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KEN+GER

Ger Spillane and Ken Ashman. Munster and All-Ireland Junior Football Winners 2001 With Cork

 

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Patrick MacCarthy

On the 8th June 1918, Eugene MacCarthy married Margaret O'Brien from Naul, Co. Dublin. When the advent of their first child was announced, Liam MacCarthy insisted that this was going to be his first completely Irish grandchild. Accordingly, Margaret was shipped to a nursing home at Leeson Street, Dublin, where on the 21st July Eoghan Patrick Pearse MacCarthy was born. Back in London, Liam MacCarthy purchased a home for the new family. The house was named St. Enda's and two further children were born there. The following is a piece written by Pat MacCarthy for inclusion in the souvenir programme on the occasion of the Official Opening of Páirc Liam MacCarthaigh. Written by Pat MacCarthy for inclusion in the souvenir programme on the occasion of the Official Opening of Páirc Liam MacCarthaigh. MY GRANDFATHER If my grandfather had been merely illustrious then I could have accepted it, half remembered in the course of time, secure in the knowledge that I could never follow in his footsteps. Having an illustrious Irish grandfather, however, has proved to be quite a different matter! Although born and bred in London, his overwhelming love of Ireland was his legacy from the very moment I was born. It was he who arranged for my mother to be shipped from London to Dublin so that this grandchild would be Irish born. It was he who saw to it that my godmother should be the mother of his dear friend, Patrick Pearse, and that I should be named after him. It was he who contrived that my first appearance in public should be at the reception of the body of Terence McSweeney into St. George's Cathedral, London, when, as babe in arms, I was photographed, wrapped in a Tricolour and carried by a uniformed Irish nurse. It was he who decided that I should be educated by the Irish Province of the De La Salle Christian Brothers in London and gloried in my green and gold school uniform. No wonder then that I should feel this "Irishness" to the extent that although living permanently in England, I have this strange , perpetual longing to be in Ireland where I am instantly and so happily at home. Here I am instantly and so happily at home. It has been said that, for most of this century, an All-Ireland Final has , more than any other assembly of Irish people, epitomised the Irish Nation. To think that it was he who saw to it that our family should be so honoured, in all perpetuity, in such a manner! No wonder then that our Cup overflows! Pat MacCarthy 3rd. March 1984 Name - Eoghan Patrick Pearse MacCarthy Born - 21st July 1920 At - Nursing Home, Leeson St. Dublin. Educated - St. Joseph's Academy, Blackheath, London SE 3 Irish Province of De La Salle Christian Brothers. Married - Eileen Mary Threse Decker, 8th. May 1943 Children - Shelagh, Patricia, Nicholas and Michael Occupation - Managing Director of W.MacCarthy & Sons Ltd. "St. Brigid's" Works, 310/326 St. Jame's Road, London SE 1 Family business in Cardbox & Container Manufacturers founded by Liam MacCarthy circa 1880. Hobbies - Fishing in Ireland

   

Individual Achievements

Individual Achievements Some of our players have represented our club at Carrigdhoun and County level. The following have represented the club on various Carrigdhoun teams, Norma Brady, Mary Hallahan, Katie Browne, Anne Browne, Julie O Sullivan, Suzanne O Sullivan, Margaret O Riordan, Rachel McCarthy, Aileen O Neill, Suzanne Barrett, Emer Dillon, Catriona Kelly, Deirdre Daly, Jennifer Browne, Maura Lane, Sally-Anne O Halloran, Denise Crowley, Kate Duane, Terri O Leary. Some of our players have also represented our club with distinction on Cork Camogie teams. Norma Brady became the first player from the club to play with Cork when she won Under-18, Junior and Intermediate medals. Jennifer Browne and Aileen O Neill won Munster Intermediate medals in 2001, and Aileen was also on the Cork Minor Team last year. Jennifer Browne, Catriona Kelly, Amanda Murphy and Aileen O Neill played with victorious Cork Junior Team in the All-Ireland league final 2001. Our two best known intercounty players are Emer Dillon and Catriona Kelly. Emer has won All-Ireland Minor Medals in 1998 and 1999 and an Intermediate All-Ireland Medal in 2000. She also has the great honour of have been awarded the player of the match in Minor Final of 1999 and the Intermediate Final of 2000. She is also the holder of three Munster U-18 medals and a Junior All Ireland League Medal. Minor Medals in 1998 and 1999 and an Intermediate All-Ireland Medal in 2000. She also has the great honour of have been awarded the player of the match in Minor Final of 1999 and the Intermediate Final of 2000. She is also the holder of three Munster U-18 medals and a Junior All Ireland League Medal. Catriona played on the Cork Minor team in 1998, 1999, and 2000 winning All-Ireland medals in 1998 and 1999. Her display at full forward in the All-Ireland final 0f 98 will live long in the memory. The Camogie Club run an Annual Golf Classic in June, which is a big fundraiser for the club. This year's event was held in the Kinsale Golf Club, in Farrangalway and was a big success.

   

Liam MacCarthy Visits Ballygarvan

MACLET Transcript of a Letter written by Liam MacCarthy to his wife during a visit to Ireland c. 1886. Eagle Hotel, Warren Place, Cork. Note: The Eagle Hotel was located at No. 35 Warren Place (now Parnell Place). Dear Alice, I sent you a telegram this afternoon, as I was too late to catch the mail. I thought it would be as well to let you know how I was. I suppose you received the letter I sent from Bruff. I met several people who knew my mother but I will not trouble you about sending an account of all I heard but will leave it until I come home. I left Bruff on Wednesday night but missed the night train to Cork so I stayed the night at Kilmallock with a good Irishman by the name of Donegan. In the morning I went by train to Cork. It really is one of the finest cities I ever saw! I will give you a description of it when I come home. I was rather tired on Thursday after travelling so much so I did not go beyond the city of Cork. On Friday I took the sidecar to Ballygarvan. It was a splendid drive but I was rather surprised when instead of finding a nice village there was only two or three poor cottages and these were very much scattered. I went into the chapel yard and whilst there a little girl brought me the key of the chapel and I went in. Well, it is a very pretty little chapel; the baptismal font is on your left as you go in the door. There are two galleries one each side of the altar and the most curious sight to me was that the holy water was in a well let into the wall of the chapel. After staying there for a while I went into a public house kept by a Mrs. Twomey who knew my father well and who gave me a lot of news about the old neighbours. She tells me there is only one of the family on my father's side and she lives in a place called in English, "The Black Hole" but father will know the Irish of it. She is married to a man by the name of Buckley. I visited Ballygarvan burial ground and shall never forget it for in going among the tall grass I slipped into a sunken grave and nearly broke my leg. I have not been able to walk since without a stick. I don't think it is very much. I visited the Holy Well and drank some of the water. The name of the well is Kill (something father will know). I saw a lot of crutches on one of the graves and on a bush near the well there must have been a thousand rags. There is a lot more to tell you but I will leave it until I come home. Hoping yourself and the children are well. (Signed) Liam. Editor's Note- The "Black Hole" refers to Poll Dubh or Pouladuff. Cork. The grave of Fr. Florence McCarthy PP, Ballygarvan and Douglas, R.I.P. 24-2-1805 is a resort of pilgrimage at Killingley cemetary. SIDECAR

   

Eoghan and Brigid MacCarthy

BRIGIDEOGHANEoghan and Brigid MacCarthy emigrated from Ballygarvan, Co. Cork in 1851. In company with other Irish emigrants they settled on the South bank of the Thames on the new site now occupied by the County Hall. Eoghan MacCarthy had very little English, and, in fact, all his life his prayers were said in Irish. Eoghan was a sportsman, athlete and wrestler, known as MacCarthy Capall (MacCarthy the Horse) in his birthplace, Shanagraigue, Ballygarvan, Co.Cork. Liam MacCarthy was born in London on the 21st May 1853 being the first son. Like his father, Liam loved sport particularly athletics, and growing up in the confines of this Irish community he took naturally to the national games and at the age of 14 he was playing hurling on Clapham Common. He earned his living as a blacksmith's hammerman working on the railways as a signals fitter. In 1875, aged 22 years, whilst residing at 1 Derwent Street, Peckham, Liam married Alice Padbury at St. George's Cathedral, Southwark. ALICEAlice was the thirteenth child of William Padbury who owned a Fancy Box factory at 176 Blackfriars Road, Southwark. Liam joined the firm but did not get-on with his in-laws. Eventually, however, he broke away and with the help of his wife and his eldest son, William, the MacCarthys started making cardboard boxes on their kitchen table. The family consisted of four boys, William Eugene (17th February 1878, Edward Dineen (13th April 1880), Francis Joseph (30th August) and Eugene (30th August 1892). The family attended mass at the Friary, Peckham where the four boys first attended school. The box-making business progressed and was separated from the family's living accommodation when it was moved to 48 Haymerle Road, Peckham, where it was called St. Brigid's Works. Apart from his sporting activities and the box-making business, Liam also took a very keen interest in local affairs and became councillor for the NorthWard, Peckham. There was a large Irish community in this area and Liam promoted Irish sporting and social activities wherever he could. The family had now moved to 48a Forest Hill Road, East Dulwich, SE 23 and his home was a meeting place for many Irish emigrants seeking a place to stay or a job. In the connection he became friendly with Michael Collins who was Secretary of the London G.A.A. whilst Liam was chairman of the London County Board, a position he held for over 10 years. He had also joined the I.R.B. and both he and his son, Eugene, were members of the London Irish Volunteers. He was also Vice-President of the Gaelic League and President of the Irish Athletic Association! No wonder then that he had a rubber stamp of his signature thus: - In 1915 a meeting of the Irish Volunteers was called under his chairmanship to discuss conscription. Michael Collins was present and although the Chairman in his capacity of London County Councillor was in no position to advise on conscription evasion, he nevertheless left one of his hearers in no doubt. "If you come from Clonakilty it is obvious where you must go" he said.

   

The Eoghan MacCarthy Cup

Report of the County Board G.A.A. meeting Cork Examiner, May 24th 1928 Ballygarvan Church Fund The reading of the following communication from Mr.Wm. MacCarthy, London donor of the All-Ireland Hurling Cup, elicited the applause of the memebers: 48A Forest Hill Road, Honor Oak, East Dulwich S.E. A Chara I will gladly order the set of medals promised as soon as you give me the word and as there is no immediate hurry for them as we have several months before us for the tournament I shall be glad to have your suggestion regarding the medals. Shall I order them right away, or leave the ordering of them till next year. My original intention was to have the medals played for this year, but as Father Russell wishes to postpone the medals till next year, I am willing to fall in with his wishes, so if you will advise me when you think the medals will be required, I will put them in hand. In order to carry out my original idea of having the hurling matches commenced fortwith I am willing to put up a cup, to be called the "Eoghan MacCarthy Cup" the competition for which will commence at once for the neighbouring parishes of Ballygarvan, this of course in addition to the medals. I am desirous that my father's name should be identified with his native place. If you will kindly let me know per return if you are willing to accept the cup I should feel greatly obliged. Is mise le meas mor, Liam MacCarthy. The Chairman said that Mr.MacCarthy was a very practical and enthusiastic supporter of the national games, and his generous action on this occasion as on many others was in keeping with the deep interest he took in the pastimes. The question of arranging a local tournament at Ballygarvan in accordance with the wishes expressed by Mr. MacCarthy was referred to the South-East Cork Divisional Committee.

   

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